Co-parenting journey: 38 weeks’ and counting down to motherhood

May 22, 2015 22:49 by PrideAngelAdmin
countdown to birth Two weeks from my due date and I’ve been on maternity leave long enough to have begun considering new parenthood with a healthy sense of impending doom. Yes I get a beautiful little baby, but by the time you’ve been to antenatal classes, breastfeeding class – ‘you have to feed them on demand, day and night, for the first six weeks or you won’t make enough milk’ - said cheerfully as though those six weeks of sleep deprivation won’t be hell on earth, baby first aid, pregnancy yoga at week 37 when getting on and off the floor is a workout in itself and had your partner try massaging your perineum (don’t even ask), you begin to realise perhaps it isn’t going to be one long nursery rhyme. That and this afternoon’s trip to my friend’s daughter’s nursery school where, like a scene from ‘Secret Life of 4 yr olds’, kiddies vie for supremacy and we find ourselves explaining why the dodgy berry picked off the floor is not a ‘nice juicy grape.’

Don’t get me wrong I’m very excited to be meeting the little person whose been kicking me in the tummy and poking her bum out when we tickle her; she’ll be ready to meet the world but will her mamas be up to it? Nothing less than being the very best parents we can be will do I’m afraid. The point now is, how does it compare to whatever thoughts and feelings we had two years ago when we began our journey towards parenthood? Part of me thought it just wouldn’t happen. Either we wouldn’t meet the right guys or perhaps I’d have trouble conceiving. Would it have been less responsibility somehow if we’d adopted? Certainly, getting a cat would have been halfway stage but worryingly, that felt like too much responsibility! And a cat couldn’t do in a flat without a garden, no, but somehow a baby can? The phrase ‘a dog is for life not just for Christmas’ is chiming in my ears. Tenfold for a kid!

Where did it all go so right? We knew it could take years to find someone to father our child – the right kind of co-parent doesn’t grow on trees. Our Pride Angel match couldn’t have been more perfect and we’ve established a great sociability that still revolves around dining, outings and theatre – all of which we’ll integrate the baby into. We’ll have known each other two years this week! And baby arrives any time now. I feel convinced she’ll look like her daddy as so many first babies do; knowing who he is was important to me for that among umpteen other reasons. I received great help from my GP referring me for a fertility check-up and AMH test (paid for of course) for peace of mind. And, by monitoring my ovulation and getting to know my cycle, by the time we did the conception correctly for the first time (at attempt three), it worked! Whilst people I know are getting on planes and re-mortgaging their flats for donor insemination in Denmark we’ve achieved the unachievable with a small syringe. I didn’t even have to stand on my head.

Eight and a half months of pregnancy certainly puts surrogacy into context – who could give up a baby they’ve carried for so long? I really don’t know how anyone can do it. The ruling in the High Court earlier this month that gave custody of a baby conceived as a surrogate to its father(s) sets a whole new precedent: www.bbc.co.uk. I like to think the ruling is not just because the mother was clearly obnoxious and homophobic.

I suspect my next blog will be entitled ‘Tired’, ‘Help’ or ‘Baby for sale’… But to anyone who feels the compulsion to parent: do whatever it takes and do it your way. Be brave, be bold. Have belief that you can make it work. And for goodness’ sake, write something down somewhere so as not to put your child through a lengthy court case. There’s good times and bad ahead and I’ll be taken to the brink, but not once for a single second will I regret achieving my goal of motherhood. And to my 16-yr old self – yes, lesbians can and should be mothers!

Article: by Two excited mums to be 22nd May 2015

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Choosing a private sperm donor, is it the right decision?

May 20, 2015 21:37 by PrideAngelAdmin
sperm donor So you have come to the decision that you are not going to meet Mr Right any time soon, or in the case of lesbian couples you have already met Mrs Right and you really want to start a family.

Is a fertility clinic right for you...

What are your options you may ask? A fertility clinic seems to be the right option but something is niggling inside of you saying 'do I really have to pay thousands of pounds or dollars to get a child of my own?' 'do I want to pick a sperm donor from a long list just based on eye colour or haircolour' 'what if I met him and I didn't even like him' or 'I really don't like the idea of spreading my legs in a fertility clinic!' or if you are in a lesbian couple you may have talked about 'wanting the conception to be a joint loving experience'.

Finding a sperm donor through the internet...

Well you are certainly not alone in having these thoughts, as many more people are turning to the internet and sperm donor websites to find their ideal genetic material for their future child. Leading connection website Pride Angel now has been than 36,000 members registered worldwide. So the web is certainly giving options to people, which they never previously had.

Are private sperm donors safe...

The concern many people have is that of how finding your own donor works and ultimately is it safe? We are often bomarded by the media about how bad and dangerous it is to find a donor from a website. With messages being given to us about 'sperm donors only being interested in sex' and 'prolific sperm donors having hundreds of children' or 'sperm donors carrying sexually transmitted diseases and genetic disorders' These negative messages breed fear and lead us running back to the safety net of regulated fertility clinics.

Benefits to choosing your own donor ...

So are these fears justified or is it just media hype. The truth is that there is always an element of risk in every choice we make, but armed with this knowledge it is possible to benefit from all advantages of finding your own donor and at the same time limit the possibility of anything going wrong. So what are the main benefits of finding your own donor and how can you keep yourself and your future child safe at the same time? Firstly finding a donor through a website puts you in control of picking the characteristics and personality traits of your donor and 50% genetics of your child. It means that you can keep in contact if you choose, and your child can get to know more about them before they reach age 18. If you prefer not to stay in touch, at least you have more info to tell your child as and when they ask questions. It means you can use fresh sperm (better chance of getting pregnant) and be flexible with your donor and fit around your fertility window. With the added benefit that it may certainly save you a packet of money which you can spend on your child instead.

Read more about how you can help minimise the risks of using a private sperm donor by getting health screening and legal advice.

Start your search of thousands of sperm donors for free now

Article: 20th May 2015 www.prideangel.com

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Pride Angel Journey - The Car

May 15, 2015 09:39 by PrideAngelAdmin
“Milkies! MILKIES!”

“We can’t while we’re in the car, Luna – we’ll be home soon for Milkies.” “MILKIES!” [sob] “Sorry my little one, not yet.”

But there was a time not so long ago when I would have performed car-seat breastfeeding acrobatics. Back then refusing ‘milky’ wasn’t an option. Now, at almost two she’s disappointed, but there’s potential for moving the conversation on, for a while at least.

“Look, what’s jangly sheep doing?” “Bouncing! Jangy seep bouncing!” “Uh uh uh uh!” “Oh Willow, you’ve lost all your toys – look here’s kitten…” “Luna kitten, Luna kitten, KITTEN!” “Shall we sing again? Oh the grand old duke of…” “Sun bwind off. Too bwight! TOO BWIGHT! … MILKIES!”

When Willow was born people kept referring to some advert on telly where a parent is driving round getting a baby to sleep and every time the car stops at traffic lights, the baby wakes up. “You’ll know about this!” They said.

But we didn’t. We had two children under fifteen months: we hadn’t watched telly in…well…fifteen months. And as for that myth of children going to sleep in car seats…?

One day I’ll have my front passenger seat back. I’ll sit back and relax and our biggest crisis as we head down the M1 will be a splash of tea escaping from my travel mug as we hit a pothole. Or that we’ve lost our place in the latest Sarah Waters novel on audiobook.

But for now, here I am in the middle back seat between two huge, rearward facing Isofix contraptions. I’m partially buried under a mound of crinkly, fluorescent Lamaze creatures all with terrifyingly huge eyes and at least two limbs joined together by a teething bar. I will replace the four sun blinds with suction-lacking suckers around 47 times during this 2-hour journey.

I will sing ‘Twinkle Twinkle, Little Star’ repeatedly for twenty minutes while eyelids flicker and it seems they might just drop off. And I WILL enjoy this chaotic, noisy muddle of a journey, because when I’m back in that front passenger seat, I’ll surely miss it.

Article: 15th May 2015 by Lindsey, West Yorkshire

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Leading fertility lawyer says UK surrogacy laws must be reformed urgently

May 10, 2015 14:13 by PrideAngelAdmin
Britain’s surrogacy laws are no longer good enough and must be reformed urgently to stop court battles wrecking people’s lives, a leading fertility lawyer has said.

Her comments follow a legal ruling where a woman who had a baby with a gay couple but then refused them access was ordered to hand her one-year-old daughter over to the men.

The judge ruled in favour of the men after concluding it would in the best interests of the girl that she grow up with her father and his partner.

The case has reopened the debate around surrogacy in the UK, where a lack of regulation means that disputes between parents and surrogates often end up in the courts.

Natalie Gamble, one of the UK’s leading fertility lawyers, said: “The law urgently needs changing. The laws in place were written in the 1980s and the world has moved on. I don’t think they were ever properly thought through.

“The situation around UK-based surrogacy is driving thousands of parents overseas every year and creating new issues such as children born to UK parents being stuck abroad. What we urgently need is a proper structure.”

Peter Morris, a partner and family law specialist at Irwin Mitchell, said: “The key issue raised by this case is that the UK lacks a clear, comprehensive legal framework to cover the concept of surrogacy.

“A number of countries, including the US, have a proper process that those involved in surrogacy must undertake. Such systems would see all of those involved make a clear agreement regarding the future of the child.”

In the latest case, the woman, identified only as S, said she had entered into an agreement, which would see her acting as the “main parent and carer”. The child’s genetic father, known as H, disputed this, saying the agreement was that he and his male partner, known as B, would “co-parent” the girl, with the woman continuing to “play a role”. The judge, Ms Justice Russell, ruled in favour of the father at the High Court.

Under UK law, surrogates are the legal mother of any child they carry, even if they are not genetically related, unless they sign a parental order after they give birth transferring their rights to the intended parents.

Article: 10th May 2015 www.independent.co.uk

Read more about Fertility Law at www.nataliegambleassociates.co.uk

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Can Fertility massage therapy help you get pregnant?

May 3, 2015 20:41 by PrideAngelAdmin
Research shows a healthy 30-year-old woman has only a 20 percent chance of getting pregnant in any given month, but when Pamela Soto turned 30, she never thought she would have a problem conceiving.

“I was on birth control for a year after we got married, and then I thought, ‘OK, well, now I’ll start trying to have a baby,’ and for two years nothing happened, so then I started going to get tested to find out what was going on,” Soto told FoxNews.com.

Demand for fertility services has surged over the last several years. In fact, 7.4 million women ages 15 to 44 have used infertility services in their lifetimes.

Pamela’s doctors said her fallopian tubes were blocked and that her only options to get pregnant would be with surgery or in vitro fertilization (IVF)— options Pamela did not want to try.

“I hate needles, and I didn’t want to go through all the emotions and the hormone shots,” said Pamela, who added that her health insurance would have paid for three IVF cycles.

Adhesions— which are comprised of internal scar tissue that forms after surgery, infection or trauma— can cause fallopian tubes to become blocked. And if the mucus that lines the tubes is too thick, this can also contribute to blockage. When one or both tubes are blocked, the egg cannot travel to the uterus and the sperm cannot reach the egg.

“After they told me that I would have to do IVF, I started looking for natural ways to solve infertility,” Soto said.

By doing a quick Google search, Pamela and her husband, John Henry Soto, found Clear Passage, a physical therapy clinic in Gainesville, Fla., that treats certain causes of female infertility like blocked fallopian tubes, endometriosis and hormonal dysfunction.

Clear Passage therapists use their hands to soften and massage away adhesions blocking the tubes.

"We feel and we check all the organs in the abdomen and the pelvis, and wherever we feel that tissues or organs won't move in a certain direction with our hands, we’ll stretch them [in that direction], and we’ll hold that stretch until the tissues and adhesions start to deform and give way," Belinda Wurn, a physical therapist and co-developer of the Clear Passage treatment, told FoxNews.com.

Physical therapists administer the deep massage-like therapy over five days and 20 hours total.

“It was an uncomfortable pressure,” Pamela said. “I wouldn't describe it as a massage at all. It was like physical therapy— it didn't hurt, but it wasn't a good feeling either."

In a retrospective study of 1,392 infertile women, published in the journal Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, the treatment showed a 60 percent success rate in opening at least one fallopian tube and a 57 percent pregnancy rate for women whose tubes have opened.

"We have enough data on enough patients to where we feel were statistically significant in opening blocked tubes, treating endometriosis and treating elevated follicle stimulating hormone," Dr. Richard King, a gynecologist and the medical director for Clear Passage Physical Therapy, told FoxNews.com.

Eight months after Pamela received therapy at Clear Passage, she discovered she was pregnant. She wrapped her positive pregnancy test in a box and surprised her husband with the news on Father’s Day.

"I can’t even imagine not having (our daughter) Brianna in our lives right now. She’s just brought so much joy to our lives," John Henry Soto told FoxNews.com

In case the Sotos want to try for a second child, King says their therapy has shown long-lasting results.

“We found that this treatment probably lasts a long period of time because we’ve had a lot of patients with blocked fallopian tubes that we’ve done this 20-hour protocol to that have had more than one child,” King said.

Although the founders tout the therapy’s success, some fertility experts have expressed skepticism over their findings.

“When you’re talking about a retrospective report, you’re saying, ‘OK, we treated these people, and these are our results.’ And that’s interesting, and their results were good in some sections, but it's not scientific in the sense of a prospective, randomized, controlled study,” Dr. Joel Batzofin, a fertility specialist at New York Fertility Services, a part of ARC fertility, told FoxNews.com. “They [the patients] were not stratified by disease type, by age, by duration of infertility, by body weight, smokers versus non-smokers, ever pregnant versus never pregnant, male factors— these are all things that have a profound bearing on results.”

Although Batzofin pointed out the importance of further study, he said the therapy may a be useful option for some patients.

“There are women that produce mucus of a thick viscus quality, and it sticks and lodges in there. The fallopian tube at the uterine end is very narrow and it gets blocked in there, so it’s quite easy to imagine that a course of physical therapy is going to soften this up, dislodge it and clear the passage,” Batzofin said.

Batzofin added that compared to surgery or IVF, the side effects are minimal.

Article: 3rd May 2015 www.foxnews.com

Read more about natural fertility at www.prideangel.com

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Fertility guru helped a thousand women get pregnant using Chinese herbs and Acupuncture

April 28, 2015 20:45 by PrideAngelAdmin
acupuncture Around one in seven couples suffer with infertility and an increasing number are seeking alternative therapies in the hope it will bring them a longed for baby.

Those who can afford it can turn to London's famous private medical haven Harley Street, where Dr Xiao-Ping Zhai has been helping women conceive for decades using only traditional Chinese medicine.

Now she's invited BBC cameras inside The Zhai Clinic, which she opened in 1996, to reveal the secrets of her success.

'I'm a doctor who initially trained in western medicine, then I studied Chinese medicine as I realised lots of problems couldn't be overcome by traditional western medicine,' she explains to Vanessa Engle for the documentary Inside Harley Street, which airs tonight on BBC2.

Dr Zhai's methods include acupuncture and prescribing a bespoke combination of Chinese herbs which must be taken day and night. The herbs may be drunk as a tea or are provided as a vitamin tablet - 12 must be taken in the morning and 12 in the evening.

The vitamins contain natural ingredients such goji berries, Chinese yan and ginger.

Dr Zhai says as a result of her natural remedies: 'I have brought more than one thousand babies into the world.' One of them was advertising director Jane Parker's son Rupert. He was conceived when she was 40.

Jane, from London, previously told the Mail On Sunday how she fell pregnant using Dr Zhai's methods after two failed cycles of IVF. She said: 'I'd read an article about her, and had arranged it even before I'd had the IVF – she had a long waiting list. I was in an emotional state of shock when I saw her in December 2008.

'I was convinced she was going to tell me I was too old. Yet she was incredibly reassuring, giving me confidence without raising my hopes to unrealistic levels. 'She ran a series of checks including blood tests and scans. She only prescribes after she's been through the results.

'In January 2009, alongside regular acupuncture sessions, I started taking specially prepared herbs, following her advice on which supplements to take and made several changes to my lifestyle (including giving up alcohol, taking no vigorous exercise and avoiding cold drinks).

'One month later, I’d just returned from holiday and realised my period was late. I bought a pregnancy test and discovered I was expecting! I carried on with the acupuncture, herbs and supplements throughout the first 12 weeks of pregnancy.

'I gave birth to Rupert in November 2009 when I was 41. I genuinely believe that if I hadn’t seen Dr Zhai, I wouldn't have my son.'

The new BBC documentary, which airs this evening follows May Lyang, 36, who hopes to have a success story like Jane's after five years of trying. She turned to Dr Zhai after losing a baby she conceived via IVF treatment on the NHS.

She said: 'I got pregnant and I carried through for 11 weeks but then I miscarried a month ago. 'I think about it every day but you have to move on so that's why I'm here. You have to take positive steps and not think about what is lost.'

May has an initial consultation with Dr Zhai which costs £250 for an hour. During the assessment, Dr Zhai quizzes her on her lifestyle and observes that she doesn't appear to be in the best health because of the appearance of her tongue and her pale complexion. But she tells her she had potential and she's confident she will conceive.

May pays £300 a month for tea made from Chinese herbs. Further check-ups with Dr Zhai will cost her £130, while three sessions of acupuncture at the clinic cost £350. After a period taking the Chinese herbal tea, she is then prescribed a mixture of Chinese herbs in a pill form which must be taken 24 times a day (12 in the morning and 12 in the evening) for two weeks, costing around £150.

The BBC documentary catches up with May months on from her first appointment with Dr Zhai and while she still hasn't become pregnant, she remains hopeful.

Read more ...

Article: 27th April 2015 www.dailymail.co.uk

Read more about fertility at www.prideangel.com

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Fairfax Cryobank offers a large selection of high quality sperm donors

April 23, 2015 15:16 by PrideAngelAdmin
sperm donor Fairfax Cryobank, Inc. has provided the highest quality donor sperm that has led to the creation of many happy healthy families for 30 years. We believe in and stand behind the exceptional quality of the donor sperm we make available to our clients. We are committed to providing the highest quality, most tested donor sperm; at Fairfax Cryobank we perform more testing than any other Cryobank in the United States.

Fairfax Cryobank offers a large selection of high quality sperm donors; only 1 in 200 applicants make it through our rigorous screening process to become donors. We perform the most extensive genetic and infectious disease testing of all sperm banks. We are dedicated to supplying updated medical and personal information on our donors.

We are accredited by the AATB (American Association of Tissue Banks) and fully compliant with FDA regulations governing reproductive tissue banks. We strive to create the best possible experience for our clients. It is important to us that your interactions with us are excellent: from your experience browsing the website to calling customer service, from the service you receive during purchase, storage or shipping, to the reporting of the birth of your child.

We have a caring, sensitive and knowledgeable Client Services Team ready to assist you in your choices. Fairfax Cryobank provides a variety of services that will support your process of selecting your perfect donor match including photo matching and a clear and user friendly donor search. We appreciate the importance of finding the right match, the total package, and so we offer incentives that allow you to purchase donor sperm and accompanying products at reduced cost.

We have a long-standing reputation of excellence with almost three decades of satisfied physicians and patients. Trust, credibility, and quality are the basis of our success.

Advertorial: 23rd April 2015 www.fairfaxcryobank.com

Photo: Michelle Ottey, PhD Director of Operations, Fairfax Cryobank.

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Fertility & IVF Information Evening in Cheshire

April 18, 2015 12:55 by PrideAngelAdmin
A Fertility and IVF information evening is being held this Wednesday evening at the Centre for Reproductive Health in Cheshire. If you are considering the option of creating your family by IVF or donor conception then this is an ideal opportunity to gain some extra information, ask questions and have a guided tour of the clinic.

The seminar is free to attend - All we ask is that you register for the event as places are limited. You can register online here.

Programme of talks:

6.00pm Welcome and Introduction Luciano Nardo, Consultant Gynaecologist & IVF Specialist

6.05pm – 6.30pm The IVF journey Ruth Arnesen, Senior Embryologist

6.30pm - 7.00pm Embryology update – what difference does time lapse make? Caroline Watkins, Embryologist

7.00pm – 7.30pm Creating a family through donor conception Karen Carmichael, Pride Angel

7.30pm – 7.45pm Q & A

7.45pm – 8.30pm Tour of the clinic

When and where:

Wednesday 22nd April 2015
6pm – 8.30pm

Centre for Reproductive Health
Daresbury Park, Cheshire, WA4 4GE

Article: 18th April 2015 wwww.reproductivehealthgroup.co.uk

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Study suggest pesticides in diet may affect sperm quality

April 13, 2015 16:19 by PrideAngelAdmin
fruit and vegetables A recent study suggests that exposure to pesticide residue through diet may affect sperm quality.

Men who consumed the greatest amount of fruit and vegetables with high levels of pesticide residue had 49 percent lower sperm count and 32 percent lower normal sperm than men who ate the least amount of produce with high pesticide residue.

However, the scientists from Harvard University's TH Chan School of Public Health say that further research is needed, and that men should not reduce the amount of fruit and vegetables in their diet on the basis of their findings.

Dr Jorge Chavarro, assistant professor of nutrition and epidemiology and lead author of the study, said: 'These findings should not discourage the consumption of fruit and vegetables in general. In fact, we found that total intake of fruit and vegetables was completely unrelated to semen quality.'

He added: 'This suggests that implementing strategies specifically targeted at avoiding pesticide residues, such as consuming organically grown produce or avoiding produce known to have large amounts of residues, may be the way to go.'

The study, published in Human Reproduction, analysed 338 semen samples from 155 men aged 18 to 55, presenting at fertility centres between 2007 and 2012. The men also completed a food frequency questionnaire to assess how often and how many portions of fruit and vegetables they consumed.

Fruits and vegetables were classified as having high, medium or low pesticide residues, according to the US Department of Agriculture pesticide data programme. Produce considered high in pesticide residue included, among others, apples, pears, strawberries, spinach and peppers. Produce considered low in pesticide residue included peas, beans, grapefruit and onions.

The men were grouped into four categories according to pesticide exposure from fruit and vegetables, ranging from high (1.5 servings per day) to low (less than half a serving per day). Men in the high-exposure group had 86 million sperm per ejaculation and 5 percent normally formed sperm, compared to 171 million sperm per ejaculation and 7.5 percent normally formed sperm in the low-exposure group.

The authors acknowledge a number of limitations to the small observational study. Men who present at fertility clinics are more likely to have problems with sperm quality than men in the general population. Diet was only assessed once during the study, and pesticide exposure from diet was not directly measured in individual participants.

In a Science Media Centre briefing, Professor Sheena Lewis of Queen's University Belfast, who was not involved in the research, noted that the sperm counts of men in both the high- and low-exposure groups were still within the normal range according to the World Health Organization.

She added that therefore 'the authors' conclusion is correct that more studies are needed, NOT that we should stop eating our 5-a-day'.

Article: 13th April 2015 Appeared in BioNews 797 www.bionews.org.uk

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Co-parenting Journey: Seven months pregnant and basking in our glow

April 9, 2015 22:50 by PrideAngelAdmin
Both my wife and I have had unanimously positive reactions to our pregnancy. The only confusion for people who don’t know our relationship background is working out what my wife means when she says “We’re seven months pregnant”. It takes a second or two for people of average intelligence to look her up and down, ascertain that she isn’t pregnant herself, and, if they reach the right conclusion unprompted, think of the possibility that she means her wife. People are getting there with it, they really are. Of course our friends and colleagues already know and are being amazing and kind, asking us how it is all going and grinning knowingly. We’ve had baby equipment donations, gifts from distant colleagues in far flung offices, hugs, smiles and the ultimate compliment, “You’re glowing!”

Pregnancy is like joining a special club. It breaks down barriers. People see my football-shaped belly from 100 paces and zone in on me with nuggets of advice, questions (‘When’s it due? Do you know what it is?’), and a general urge to stand a little closer, perhaps touch me, as a fount of life. The best opener I’ve had so far has been “If you need to be induced, go and do reflexology instead – it might make you go into labour.” This was in a cinema. And this morning, kindly encouragement from the milk shop cashier: “Try to push, don’t let them cut you.” I find myself doing it too. Zeroing in on other expectant mothers with the same excited (albeit slightly banal) need to engage: “Ooh that’s a big bump.” Yes, I actually said that to someone. In all, I’ve never spoken to so many kind friendly strangers as since my baby bump has been noticeable.

Reactions from animals are much the same; cats snuggle up to my belly. Another literally sprang on to it, kneading, pawing and purring (it was a cat-nip kind of moment). On googling it I didn’t find a concrete link other than ‘they just know’ – clearly it’s such a primordial, instinctive, deeply animal thing to humans and animals alike.

I offered my wife the chance to pen some words about how she’s feeling as the ‘un-pregnant parent’. Being a stereotypical scientist, this did not go down too well and as is oft the case, I am left to mine, extract and interpret her thoughts and feelings. All the signs are good; she’s talking and singing to my belly, engaging in the purchasing of baby things. She’s got the room painted and most importantly assists in tricky leaning forward tasks – standing up, stairs, anything to do with feet, socks, shoes and laces. With the aid of her earplugs, she sure isn’t losing sleep.

Inevitably the perceptions and reactions of others comes into it. How do our families feel? Well no one, partially estranged or otherwise, has even breathed the old humdinger of biological fact that the baby ‘isn’t hers’. This is great as it has been known to crop up in even the most loving family circles to fly in the face of couples’ obvious focus on their baby for all the reasons it is both of theirs (just sayin). In other situations it’s slighted the sturdiest emotional house of cards in response to same-sex parenting and a collective preoccupation with the baby’s ‘origin’. Thank goodness not in our case, perhaps my greatest fear unrealised, we’re lucky, loved and loving it.

On the plus side, being a scientist (of questionable emotional depth), my wife can ever be relied upon for taking the simple, instinctive approach to non-scientific questions. We’re seven months pregnant and our daughter is soon to change our lives forever.

Article: Two excited mums to be 9th April 2015 www.prideangel.com

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